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New Molecule Could Fight Oxidative Stress, Lead to Therapies for Cancer, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease, MU Researchers Say

Oct. 01, 2014

Breathing oxygen helps the body create energy for its cells. As a result of the breathing process, reactive molecules called “free radicals” are produced that often cause damage to proteins and genes found in cells. This damage is known as oxidative stress. Free radicals also have been linked to cancer, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Now, investigators at the University of Missouri have discovered a molecule that treats oxidative stress.  Full Story
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Intervention Helps Decrease “Mean Girl” Behaviors, MU Researchers Find

Combination of group counseling, caregiver training reduces relational aggression in teen girls

Oct. 01, 2014

Relational aggression, or “mean girl” bullying, is a popular subject in news and entertainment media. This nonphysical form of aggression generally used among adolescent girls includes gossiping, rumor spreading, exclusion and rejection. As media coverage has illustrated, relational aggression can lead to tragic and sometimes fatal outcomes. Despite these alarming concerns, little has been done to prevent and eliminate these negative behaviors. Now, University of Missouri researchers have developed and tested an intervention that effectively decreases relational aggression among teen girls.  Full Story
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