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Rising Temperatures from Climate Variability May Slow Critical Lizard Behaviors

March 30, 2015

Spring is here and ectotherms, or animals dependent on external sources to raise their body temperature, are becoming more active. Recent studies have shown that as the average global temperature increases, some lizards may spend more time in the shade and less time eating and reproducing, which could endanger many species. Now, a detailed field study of the Puerto Rican crested anole by a University of Missouri researcher shows that lizards are active over a broader range of temperatures than scientists previously thought—but when temperatures are either too hot or too cold, critical activity levels slow, limiting the abilities of species to cope with climate variability.  Full Story
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Prominent Animal and Human Health Scholar Joins Faculty

Researcher’s work on livestock fertility could help solve women’s fertility issues

March 30, 2015

The University of Missouri is one of 34 public universities in the Association of American Universities (AAU) and is recognized for its national expertise in many academic fields. MU’s prominent faculty scholars and scientists bring their discoveries into the classroom while attracting multi-million dollar grants and publishing more than 1,500 books and scholarly articles each year. Recently, Mizzou officials hired a prominent animal and human health scholar. Thomas Spencer is internationally recognized for his research in reproductive and developmental biology. Spencer accepted an appointment in the Division of Animal Sciences with a joint appointment in the School of Medicine’s Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health.  Full Story
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